PoE Posts

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[workshop]: Integrative Knowledge E-Portfolio Workshops

Integrative Knowledge E-Portfolio Workshops

What’s an integrative knowledge e-portfolio and why should I make one? During this interactive workshop, you will answer these questions and gain an overview of building an online integrative knowledge portfolio, demonstrating your learning in and outside the classroom. Whether you are interested in developing an e-portfolio for a class, for potential employers to complement your resume, or as a way to document and reflect on your experiences, this workshop will provide you with a starting place. This workshop will:

  • ·         Guide you through short hands-on activities that will allow you to begin identifying deep connections between your learning, your experiences and your life-goals
  • ·         Share example integrative knowledge e-portfolios
  • ·         Provide you with resources for creating your e-portfolio.

Join us and learn how to showcase your learning in connection with real-world experiences! RSVP at https://expo.uw.edu/expo/rsvp/event/428, though drop-ins are always welcome!

Spring Workshop Dates:

  • ·         Wednesday, May 7, 3:30-4:30pm, MGH 171

Additional information is available at http://expd.washington.edu/eportfolio.

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[scholarship]: PoE Environmental Leadership Scholarship for Autumn 2014

The Program on the Environment (PoE) at the University of Washington is pleased to announce the PoE Environmental Leadership Scholarship. The scholarship recognizes the outstanding achievements, leadership skills, and potential of students pursuing a future in the environmental field.

Applications are now being accepted until May 16, 2014 at 5:00 pm. See below for more information about how to apply for this scholarship, and please direct any questions about applying to Joe Kobayashi at: jkob@uw.edu.

Program on the Environment Environmental Leadership Scholarship

The Program on the Environment (PoE) trains students to address environmental challenges that defy traditional academic and disciplinary boundaries. Two Environmental Leadership Scholarships of $1,000 each will be awarded to two PoE students who demonstrate a passion for environmental studies, integrative thought and action in their academics and activities, and a vision of how they hope to make a positive difference in the world. Read more about the 2013 recipients here.

Award

  • Two, $1,000 scholarships to be used for tuition, books, and/or fees for academic year 2014/15.

Eligibility Criteria

  • Must be officially declared as an Environmental Studies major at the time of application and receipt of award.
  • Academic excellence with a minimum cumulative UW GPA of 3.25
  • Have not previously received a PoE Environmental Leadership scholarship

Application Process

Read more …

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Summer Course: Reading the Elwha

READING THE ELWHA: Tracing the Dynamics of Landscape Change
L ARCH 498A (SLN# 11964); L ARCH 598A (SLN# 11968); 4 credits

Planning Meeting July 24th, 2014, 5:00-7:00 pm, GLD 312
Camping Trip:  July 28th - August 1st, 2014

Located on the Olympic Peninsula, the Elwha Rivers flows north out of the Olympic Mountains in Olympic National Park before emptying into the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Historically the river supported diverse and viable populations of five species of salmonids, but for the last century two dams have blocked the river to migration and altered the biophysical processes of the watershed.

After three years of deconstruction, the dams will have been fully removed and the historic flows of the river will return. The removal marks the largest dam removal in U.S. history and establishes a precedent for the future management of rivers in the Pacific Northwest and the U.S.

This course is a five-day, four night (July 28th – August 1st, 2014) field intensive exploration of the watershed. Activities include moderate hiking in all areas of the watershed and discussions with the public agencies and tribes that have led and are studying the biophysical responses of the river. Aside from the week!

Please direct inquiries to Ken Yocom, kyocom@uw.edu.

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[internship]: King County Wastewater Treatment Division Community Relations Intern (paid)

King County Invites Applications for the Position of:
Intern-Community Relations Apply online at http://www.kingcounty.gov/jobs


King County is committed to equity and diversity in the workplace. In addition, the county is committed to recruiting and maintaining a quality workforce that shares our guiding principles: collaborative, service-oriented, results-focused, accountable, innovative, professional and fair and just.

OPENING DATE/TIME: 04/21/14 12:00 AM (GMT -8:00)
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 05/14/14 04:30 PM (GMT -8:00)
SALARY: $13.39 /Hour
LOCATION: Multiple locations in King County
JOB TYPE: Intern
DIVISION: Department of Natural Resources & Parks - Wastewater Treatment Division
JOB NUMBER: 2014SN03838

SUMMARY:
The Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) community services team is seeking two intern or work study students to provide education, public involvement, outreach and communication assistance in support of WTD’s long-standing mission to educate the public about the health and environmental benefits of wastewater infrastructure in our region.
This position is effective July 1,2014 and will continue through June 1, 2015 so long as minimum qualifications and work schedule requirements continue to be met.

Read more …

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Steps to a Great Commencement Day

Husky Stadium – June 14, 2014

Visit www.uwgraduation.com for complete ceremony information.

 1.      Eligibility:

Bachelor Candidates:  Students who earned a degree in Summer 2013, Autumn 2013, or Winter 2014, or have applied to graduate with a departmental advisor for Spring 2014 or Summer 2014 are eligible. Once the application for graduation has been completed and received by the Office of Graduation and Academic Records (206-543-1803), the student will be eligible to complete the Commencement Registration/Order Form.

Master’s, Doctoral or Professional Candidates: Graduates who earned their degrees in Summer 2013, Autumn 2013, or Winter 2014 or candidates who have a reasonable expectation of graduating in Spring 2014 or Summer 2014 are eligible to participate.

Names Listed in Program:  The Commencement program lists the names of graduates from Summer 2013 through Spring 2014.  Note: Spring 2014 Bachelor’s Degree candidates must have their Application to Graduate submitted and received by the Office of Graduation and Academic Records by the April 18th deadline in order to have their names listed. Master’s and Doctoral degree candidates must have their Master’s Degree Request submitted or Doctoral Final Exam scheduled, by April 18th in order to have their names listed.  Summer 2014 graduates’ names will be listed in the following year’s program.  Students who do not wish to have their names listed in the program must contact the Office of the Registrar (206-543-5378).  

Honors: If you qualify for College, Departmental, or Interdisciplinary Honors, be sure you or your advisor has submitted your Departmental Honors Invitation to the Honors Program (MGH 211 or Box 352800) by April 18, 2014.  For baccalaureate honors information visit: http://www.washington.edu/students/gencat/front/Deans_List.html#BH.

2.      Signing Up and Ordering Apparel, Parking Permits, and Guest Tickets online

 Register/Place your order online:  May 7 – May 25 at www.graduation.uw.edu

 Husky Stadium Ceremony: Participants must register and order tickets, pre-paid parking permits, and apparel no later than May 25th via the above website.  Payment will be taken online when finalizing your order.  Visa, MasterCard, debit card, or valid checking account number will be accepted.

Apparel prices: Bachelor apparel (purchase only) - $45.00, Master’s apparel (purchase only) - $65.00, Professional apparel (rental) - $75.00, Ph.D. (rental) - $85.00. **See website for Professional/Doctoral purchase information.

 **For our doctoral candidates, we are offering a special opportunity to meet with Oak Hall Cap & Gown. They will be on campus (Mary Gates Hall, Room 134 - the Career Center) on April 9 and April 10, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., to answer any questions doctoral candidates might have about purchasing academic regalia.  To schedule an appointment with Oak Hall, please fill out our catalyst survey at byhttps://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/ceremony/231881 by April 8th.  We will contact them to let them know about appointment times.

Parking Permits: Purchase campus parking online during registration atwww.graduation.uw.edu.

3.      Individual School/College or Departmental Ceremony participants must order via the above website by May 25th, 2014, if your ceremony requires apparel or parking permits.  Permits ($14) are required to park on campus during normal parking hours or on June 14th.  Payment will be taken online.

 4.      Pick Up Your Order: May 29th – June 7th (students will select specific dates online) at the UW Book Store (during normal book store hours).

5.      Come to Husky Stadium, June 14th, at 12:30.  CONGRATULATIONS!

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Student Experience in the Research University (SERU)

There’s an important student survey called the SERU underway at the UW. Participate in it and you will help improve the undergraduate experience. The Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) covers a broad range of topics, from the amount of time undergraduates spend studying to the type of research experiences they enjoy. Questions gauge the impact of college on such areas as critical thinking, academic preparation, research experiences, time management and overall satisfaction, and results will be used to improve our understanding of educational best practices at leading research universities. All degree-seeking undergraduate students who are 18 years old or older and currently enrolled at UW Seattle are eligible to participate – help us improve our academic and student-life programs and maybe win a major prize!  Take the survey and learn more here:  http://surveys.uw.edu/

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Nonprofit Fundraising Study

A group of researchers in the School of Forest and Environmental Sciences and the Department of Economics at the University of Washington is conducting a study to learn more about mechanisms used by nonprofit organizations to raise funds for providing public goods and services.

Students at the University of Washington who are over 18 years in age are eligible to participate. No specific knowledge or skill is required. Participation in this study is completely voluntary.

The study will involve  participating in a computer based experiment on decision-making. To thank the participants for their time, they will receive $5 for showing up at the specified location and time. They will additionally be awarded between $5 and $80 based on their choices in the study. 

Please reserve a spot by sending an email to bijetri@uw.edu. 

Enrollment is limited to 12 students in each time slot. If more than 12 students show up, participation will be based on a first-come-first-served basis. If not selected to participate, $5 will still be paid for showing up. 

This study should take no more than 2 hours of your time.

Location

Room 261, Bloedel Hall

 Time Slots

23rd April, 2014: 10.20 a.m. & 5.30 p.m.  

25th April, 2014: 1.30 p.m. & 3.30 p.m.

28th April, 2014:  10.30 a.m.

30th April, 2014:  10.30 a.m. & 1.30 p.m. & 5.30 p.m.

2nd May, 2014: 1.30 p.m. & 3.30 p.m.

Any information gathered in the study will be kept confidential. The data will be reported only in the aggregate and you will not be identified in any way. Please note that we cannot guarantee the confidentiality of e-mail communications.

If you have any questions or need any clarifications, please send an email to bijetri@uw.edu.

Your participation will be appreciated greatly.

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Great thought for Juniors that are starting to think about what they want to do after graduation. This could be a great opportunity to learn about how you can apply to depart for Peace Corps service in the summer of 2015. Peace Corps is looking for volunteers to serve in Youth, Health, Business, Education, Environment and Agriculture!

Great thought for Juniors that are starting to think about what they want to do after graduation. This could be a great opportunity to learn about how you can apply to depart for Peace Corps service in the summer of 2015. Peace Corps is looking for volunteers to serve in Youth, Health, Business, Education, Environment and Agriculture!

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Exciting research positions in Mountain Hydrology We are planning to fill the following positions, to start work on June 16, 2014. Pay rate $13 to $15 per hour, dependent on experience. Summer-only research field technicians: 3 to 4 people are needed to deploy digital cameras and measurement poles in remote regions of Olympic National Park. (2 people will be needed both for instrument preparation and for fieldwork, with a 2-month minimum commitment.1-2 people will be needed only for 3 field trips of approximately 7 days each.) The cameras will be taking photographs of snow accumulating on the poles throughout the winter to quantify spatial patterns of snow in these mountains for the OLYMPEX field campaign (http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~brodzik/html/olympex/). Applicants must have an interest in snow and mountains and an ability to hike long distances over uneven terrain while carrying heavy and potentially odd-shaped objects (e.g., sections of PVC pipe and solar panels). Applicants must be available for training in late June, and in August and early September for deployments. (Note:Fieldwork will not conflict with regular UW classes.) The following skill/experiences are desired (though applicants with most but not all of these will be considered): 1) ability to fix things relying only on supplies you carry (e.g., experience with circuits, fixing cars, construction, home repair), 2) ability to work well with others in potentially harsh weather conditions, 3) good communication skills, 4) good organizational skills (e.g., experience with organizing/leading outdoor trips and/or with teaching/instruction/management), 5) ability to think quickly on one’s feet and innovate (e.g., solve problems not seen before). Long-term undergraduate research aide: 1 to 2 people are needed to work up to full time in the summer and part time through the academic year to 1) maintain instrumentation at Snoqualmie Pass (seehttp://depts.washington.edu/mtnhydr/research/intermitsnow.shtml), 2) maintain web presentation and archiving of data collected (see http://depts.washington.edu/mtnhydr/cgi/plot.cgi) , 3) process field data from various data sites across the western United States, 4) procure field equipment as needed, 5) copy and scan material as needed, 6) attend group meetings and 7) provide progress reports and updates to supervisor on a weekly basis. Past students in this position have won Mary Gates Undergraduate Research scholarships, and many have gone on to graduate school. Computer experience is required, with knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel and Matlab (or other similar programming language) highly desirable. Experience with GIS, circuits, and web(html)-programming also desired.Must be hard-working, organized and reliable. Potential combined position: Students interested in both Olympic National Park fieldwork and longer term snow research are particularly desirable. Please specify if you would like to be considered for a long-term position participating in all of these activities. To Apply: If you are interested in any of these positions, please fill out the web survey at: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/jdlund/233885 before 5 pm on May 1st. We will be contacting highly-ranked individuals for interviews in May. Specific questions may be directed to Jessica Lundquist at jdlund@uw.edu.

Exciting research positions in Mountain Hydrology 

We are planning to fill the following positions, to start work on June 16, 2014. Pay rate $13 to $15 per hour, dependent on experience. 

Summer-only research field technicians: 

3 to 4 people are needed to deploy digital cameras and measurement poles in remote regions of Olympic National Park. (2 people will be needed both for instrument preparation and for fieldwork, with a 2-month minimum commitment.1-2 people will be needed only for 3 field trips of approximately 7 days each.) The cameras will be taking photographs of snow accumulating on the poles throughout the winter to quantify spatial patterns of snow in these mountains for the OLYMPEX field campaign (http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~brodzik/html/olympex/). Applicants must have an interest in snow and mountains and an ability to hike long distances over uneven terrain while carrying heavy and potentially odd-shaped objects (e.g., sections of PVC pipe and solar panels). Applicants must be available for training in late June, and in August and early September for deployments. (Note:Fieldwork will not conflict with regular UW classes.) The following skill/experiences are desired (though applicants with most but not all of these will be considered): 1) ability to fix things relying only on supplies you carry (e.g., experience with circuits, fixing cars, construction, home repair), 2) ability to work well with others in potentially harsh weather conditions, 3) good communication skills, 4) good organizational skills (e.g., experience with organizing/leading outdoor trips and/or with teaching/instruction/management), 5) ability to think quickly on one’s feet and innovate (e.g., solve problems not seen before). 

Long-term undergraduate research aide: 

1 to 2 people are needed to work up to full time in the summer and part time through the academic year to 1) maintain instrumentation at Snoqualmie Pass (seehttp://depts.washington.edu/mtnhydr/research/intermitsnow.shtml), 2) maintain web presentation and archiving of data collected (see http://depts.washington.edu/mtnhydr/cgi/plot.cgi) , 3) process field data from various data sites across the western United States, 4) procure field equipment as needed, 5) copy and scan material as needed, 6) attend group meetings and 7) provide progress reports and updates to supervisor on a weekly basis. Past students in this position have won Mary Gates Undergraduate Research scholarships, and many have gone on to graduate school. Computer experience is required, with knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel and Matlab (or other similar programming language) highly desirable. Experience with GIS, circuits, and web(html)-programming also desired.Must be hard-working, organized and reliable. 

Potential combined position: 

Students interested in both Olympic National Park fieldwork and longer term snow research are particularly desirable. Please specify if you would like to be considered for a long-term position participating in all of these activities. 

To Apply: 

If you are interested in any of these positions, please fill out the web survey at: 

https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/jdlund/233885 

before 5 pm on May 1st. We will be contacting highly-ranked individuals for interviews in May. Specific questions may be directed to Jessica Lundquist at jdlund@uw.edu.

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New Summer Course! Anthropology of the Wilderness

ANTH 269: Anthropology of the Wilderness (B-term)

In the US, the concept of the Wilderness is something that is often taken as a natural or a universal idea; however, the Wilderness is in fact full of contradictions, history, culture, and social values. This course is designed to more critically understand the Wilderness as an idea and a place. By examining its history, current practices and policies, and critiques, students will gain a complex social understanding of the Wilderness. The beginning of the course will trace Wilderness history, situating it within US colonial history and the American environmental movement. Further, we will explore more contemporary Wilderness practices and policies, and current issues. The middle of the course is dedicated to exploring different ways community members, scholars, and activists are challenging and/or reshaping the concept of the Wilderness. This portion of the course engages conversations not only directly addressing the Wilderness, but also voices of scholars who provide alternative land epistemologies. In the final portion of the class, students will use course knowledge to analyze different Wilderness institutions, practices, and discourses.  This course asks students not only to engage with scholarly text, but also policy, popular media, and personal experience. Students will leave the course with a more complex understanding of the Wilderness, its history, critiques, and current manifestations.
 
Contact the instructor, Ava Holliday, with any questions at avaholliday@gmail.com
**Just added to the P&E list for PoE majors under Human and Social/Policy and Decision-making!**